Cedeño Law Group, PLLC - Divorce
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Cedeño Law Group, PLLC - Divorce
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The grey divorce rate has risen as the overall rate has gone down

Many New Yorkers go into a marriage assuming that it will last forever, but for a variety of reasons, a portion of marriages end in divorce. There was a time when it seemed that once older couples reached a certain age, they tended to stay together whether they were happy or not. Today, there’s more evidence of a phenomenon called grey divorce.

“Grey divorce” is the term used to describe a divorce that happens between older individuals over the age of 50 who have been married a long time. Sometimes referred to as silver or diamond splitters, these older couples have decided that even though they’re older, they still have an opportunity to live a great life post-divorce.

The term “grey divorce” first appeared 2004, but the actual pattern started at least 20 years prior. As the overall divorce rate in the United States has fallen, the divorce rate for couples over the age of 50 has actually increased.

The reasons for grey divorces are often the same as the reasons for divorces in younger demographics. Sometimes, people grow apart because of infidelity. In the case of infidelity in the past, older couples may have stayed together because it was expected of them. Older couples today realize that there’s much less stigma against separating. In addition, older couples have higher life expectancy rates than they did years ago. Many of them have started brand-new careers later in life, and they realize that there are many more opportunities open to them.

Divorce is hard no matter what age demographic the couple is in. Older individuals considering a divorce may want to work with family law attorneys who have experience overseeing grey divorce. An attorney may help handle the unique financial and other issues that go along with an older couple’s decoupling.

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